Thursday, November 4, 2010

Last Quotes From Twitter

Not because folks aren't saying great things still, but I think I've run this idea into the ground and doing this last, very short, set will be a way to start my blog up again after several months of regrettable inactivity.

@FunnyOneLiners - A mighty oak is the result of a nut that held it's ground.

Abraham Williams - Sometimes I write a letter on paper with a pen then burn it laughing about how Google must be crying over information it will never index.

Albert Einstein (via Jason Yip) - The formulation of a problem is often more essential than its solution...

Albrecht & Zemke (via @ASQ) - People do not just buy things, they also buy expectations.

Bob Marshall - Agile successes - or not; echoes of Rashomon?

Dale Emery – The values (then the principles, then the practices) stand at the brink and wave goodbye as the name moves on. Michael Bolton - I said a couple years back that Agile hasn't crossed the chasm; it's mostly fallen in. But the name made it across.

David Joyce - Toyota manager induction doesn’t take place in a room but instead 12 weeks are spent in the work being coached on how to solve problems.

G. K. Chesterton (via Jason Yip) - There are two ways to get enough: One is to continue to accumulate more and more. The other is to desire less.

Glyn Lumley - The manner in which employees treat customers is determined, in part, by the norms for handling internal conflict and frustration.

James Bach - If you don't have a clear goal in life-- then watch out!-- you might wander and learn cool things that no one anticipated. Payson Hall (replied with this from Tolkien) - Not all those who wander are lost.

Jay Arthur - At one time, customers wanted you to be better, faster and cheaper. Now, they want everything free, perfect and now.

Michael James (actually from a mailing list talking about Scrum and Kanban) - I'm not sure it matters too much whether someone edits with vi or emacs, as the real challenge is what's in the file.

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